Stormwater disconnections

A primary goal of MSD Project Clear is to get the rain out of the wastewater sewer system to reduce basement backups and overflows. Over the next several years, MSD and its contractors will work on hundreds of projects throughout MSD’s service area to achieve this important goal. Stormwater disconnections are unique to the separate sewer area, entirely in the Saint Louis County area. Of particular importance is the effort to remove connections of stormwater to the wastewater sewer in areas where the two are meant to be separated.

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Rainscaping

Rainscaping is any combination of plantings, water features, catch basins, permeable pavements, and other activities that manage stormwater as close as possible to where it falls, rather than moving it someplace else. Below ground level, improved soils store and filter stormwater, allowing the surrounding area to slowly absorb it over time. Above ground level, native plants, basins, and water features create public green spaces that also help store water.

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Early Action Program

The Rainscaping program of MSD Project Clear is pleased to announce the second round of a green infrastructure program cost sharing opportunity. As part of MSD Project Clear, MSD’s Consent Decree with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, MSD will spend $100 million in Rainscaping investments over a period of 23 years, with an overall goal of reducing combined sewer overflows to the Mississippi River. The consent decree allows for early implementation of high priority projects before the green infrastructure plan is finalized and approved by the EPA.

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Cityshed Mitigation Program

St. Louis City is largely served by combined sewers, which means that a single pipe carries stormwater and wastewater. Excess stormwater to the system can cause the system to surcharge, causing basement backups and, in some cases, overland flooding. The goal of the Cityshed Mitigation Program is to alleviate the effect of wet weather surcharging and overland flooding of the combined sewer system. MSD plans to spend $230 million in combined sewer area sub-watersheds over the life of MSD Project Clear.

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